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About


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About


Cursive is an art. 

It's woven into the very fabric of our constitution. Yet, everywhere we look, it's literally being written out of existence. Like a sandcastle built at the edge of the sea, with each crashing wave, the strokes of cursive slowly fade away.

Once the very heart of public school education, cursive is aggressively being replaced by computer classes. Instead of learning the basics of handwriting, children are increasingly being introduced to the nuances of the keyboard.

Now, there's absolutely no denying the importance that computers play in our world. You're reading this message in print, on a computer or mobile device. Still, writing matters. It makes a difference.

We've put together a number of perspectives on why we think cursive is important. And, ultimately, why we think it should be saved. Why would you save cursive? We'd love to hear.

Writing matters. #savingcursive

 
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History


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History


Sign with a bold hand.

In 1863 when the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, Abraham Lincoln said, "I believe in this measure my fondest hopes will be realized." But, as Doris Kearns Goodwin explains, "as he was about to put his signature on the proclamation, his own hand was numb and shaking because he had shaken a thousand hands that morning at a new years reception. So he put the pen down and said, "If ever my soul were in an act it is in this act, but if I sign with a shaking hand, posterity will say, he hesitated." So he waited until he could take up the pen and sign with a bold and clear hand."

Writing matters. #savingcursive

 
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Education


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Education


Cursive isn't just a pretty script. 

There's a reason it exists. In fact, there are a number of reasons. We thought we'd present the case for what we consider to be the three most important factors: ease of use, letter recognition and visual coherence. 

1. Picture a child holding a crayon. What do they do? They start to scribble, with connected lines. Cursive is straightforward, while print is so punctual and truncated, making it extremely difficult for a child to master those movements. Cursive is the easiest and most natural extension of a child's movements. Cursive is the bridge...

2. With cursive, there's no confusing letters, as each letter in the alphabet is completely different. Whereas in print, a child may encounter an issue with letter recognition, mixing up b and d or p and q, in cursive, there is no problem. Close your eyes and picture a cursive b. Now picture a cursive d. Do they look the same, even when you flip them around?

3. Now, imagine yourself just starting out, attempting to writing a word. In cursive, those letters are connected, forming a whole, whereas in print, each letter is separated. With cursive, then, children who learn to read this way, transition very quickly to print, and often ahead of their peers.

Writing matters. #savingcursive

 
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Science


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Science


Your Brain on Cursive:

In an extremely fascinating article, "What Learning Does for Your Brain", Dr. Klemm writes on the benefits of cursive:

"Scientists are discovering that learning cursive is an important tool for cognitive development, particularly in training the brain to learn “functional specialization," that is capacity for optimal efficiency. In the case of learning cursive writing, the brain develops functional specialization that integrates both sensation, movement control, and thinking. Brain imaging studies reveal that multiple areas of brain become co-activated during learning of cursive writing of pseudo-letters, as opposed to typing or just visual practice. Cursive writing helps train the brain to integrate visual, and tactile information, and fine motor dexterity. School systems, driven by ill-informed ideologues and federal mandate, are becoming obsessed with testing knowledge at the expense of training kids to develop better capacity for acquiring knowledge."

Then, in a memorable quote, he writes: 

"Brain imaging studies show that cursive activates areas of the brain that do not participate in keyboarding."

Writing matters. #savingcursive

 
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Art


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Art


Cursive informs Art.

Art plays an important role in our life. We all know the power it holds, to captivate no less than to inspire. Art, to be sure, is one of our first creative expressions. It's an outlet for our emotions, a portal to our imagination. Many of us grow up with a crayon or paintbrush in our hand, turning any blank page into an exhibition piece. We make scribbles and swirls, an army of brushstrokes to try to capture our dreams. This is the beginning of learning how to write.

Then, as we acquire that ability, our focus often starts to shift. We aspire in words or sentences, or perhaps even stories. It's not that the images aren't there, we just have a different approach - trying to track them down the best we can. Of course, it's not the same for everyone. Yet, art and writing are so clearly, intricately intertwined. Some of us will later return to paint or draw, while others will only persist to write. Each of us has our own proclivities, but writing and art, to be sure, are bound in unimaginably beautiful ways. As Paul Klee states, "The conviction that painting is the right profession grows stronger and stronger in me. Writing is the only other thing I still feel attracted to. Perhaps when I am mature I shall go back to it."

"Drawing is taking a line for a walk." - Paul Klee

Writing matters. #savingcursive

 
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Expression


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Expression


Cursive is the langauge of love. 

We all enjoy love letters. There's just something about those lines. Especially when you read them, again and again, tracing those aberrant curves with your mind. They take you on an adventure. Whether the letters were written from your sister in the south of France or your lover just down the street, there's something palpable about the way they make you feel. The handwritten notes. The care. The craftsmanship. The speed that cursive demands. It's not easy to pour your heart out onto the page. Gestures say everything. Perhaps the very best example of such a deluge of exchanges comes from Elizabeth Barrett and her future husband, Robert Browning. This is but a glimpse. If you have the time, you should read them all. They'll warm your heart and fire up your cursive quill. 

 

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"I love your verses with all my heart, dear Miss Barrett." 

- Robert Browning

 

Writing matters. #savingcursive

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"I thank you, dear Mr. Browning, from the bottom of my heart."

-Elizabeth Barrett Browning

 

 
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Tell us


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Tell us


 

Why would you save cursive? 

Name
Name
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Intro to Cursive


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Intro to Cursive


Download Now.

When the world literally writes off cursive, we build an app dedicated solely to the art of teaching handwriting. Learn to trace, read and write letter sounds, names and phonograms, in cursive. Learn more about The Case for Cursive, or download nowYou can also read our article on the Atlantic, "Don't Write off Cursive". 

Writing matters #savingcursive